Write a little everyday

Have you ever struggled with getting something done?

I could receive a crown for procrastinating especially when it comes to the latest book I’ve been writing and I got so frustrated today that I had to check in with a close friend. She’s writing her first book and we have this way of texting each other best wishes. So, when I shared my struggle she said “Just write a little every day.”

Well, I tried to do just that but it’s not helping!

So, what do you do when you seek advice but are not content or willing to try out the advice given?

I’ll admit that to some extent, my frustration lies in my expectation of a perfect script. A story that’s so seamless and entertaining that’ll leave the reader swooning and talking about it for years to come. It therefore follows that everything I do now with this kind of expectation is bound to fall short and that adds onto my frustration.

As I ponder of this dark cloud that I’ve refused to let go of, I figured why not look back at my April goals and share what I have been up to the past few days?

  • I made it to Nairobi and was there just in time for the celebration of #YALIat2000 held at Kenyatta University.

While in the capital city, I also treated myself to three of my favorite things: bookmarks, books and earrings.

100_7527
5 bookmarks for $1 at Hilton Arcade-Nairobi 
100_7529
Bookhaul 🙂 courtesy of Inama Bookshop near Fire Station on Tom Mboya Street.
100_7536
I love glass earrings so, I had to get these!
  • These two lovely notebooks are gifts from my insightful sister who knows that stationery is my kryptonite! She got them at a new store called Miniso 🙂

100_7532

I have to work on my impatience with this script and the only way I know how to do this is by venting my anger on paper- or by starting another script, but doing the latter would cost me time and probably make me lose focus on this current script.

I’ll mull over it for an hour or so, but all in all, I can’t wait to cozy up to this book:

100_7539

Advertisements

Stepping out

Is it too late to say “happy new year?”

I hope this post finds you at your best and if not, I hope it will be one of the sparks that would continue igniting the fire within you.

January’s not my most favorite month, however it is my most inspirational month because my sister was born on this month and she’s my strength. If there’s anyone who has zest, flair, hope and humor it’s got to be her. As I type this I am in Brackenhurst, a great outdoors environment in Limuru.

Brackenhurst Hotel and Conference Center

I was so excited about being selected to join the Young African Leaders Initiative (YALI) last year and was bummed when it was postponed to June this year due to the political situation in Kenya. However, I got an email from the team in December about moving it up to January and I jumped on it😄.

I’m taking part in Cohort 21 and being in Limuru has seen me tackle challenging tasks. I scaled a pole, leaped off a few boards, balanced mid-air, had a panic attack, passed out but woke up feeling okay.

I’ve made friends, received insights on how to grow as a leader and learned how to count to ten in Arabic. It’s day two with many more to go and I’m glad I am doing this.

I’ve had a great start to 2018 because I’ve embraced my aspirations and I realize that stepping out into the world to do what I love is not as scary as I thought it’d be. I’m being challenged by world leaders from 13 African countries, learning about their culture, innovations, impact and fostering partnerships. 

So, what’s your start been like? 

What are you looking forward to building upon? 

I wish you lots of love and best wishes and while I’m at it, I’m looking forward to releasing two books this Spring😎.

I bought this @250/= at Textbook Centre
This piece of art is in my KUCC Annex room
First offi-casual look of 2018 @Brackenhurst

Writing and reading updates

Hello Monday! Is there any #NanoWrimo2017 participant freaking out because it’s three days to the end of November?

So, yesterday I went to the market and got my favorite things: Tamarind ( I used it to make some sauce for the fries), mangoes, lemons and of course the irish potatoes for making the fries! I had a laid back Sunday afternoon and when the sun was up, I managed to bask in it for a few minutes before making some calls.

On writing:

  • I am past 40,000 words on the project I’m submitting for NanoWrimo. It has been a very difficult week because my writing schedule has seen me waking up at 1 A.M. to write till 4 A.M. I’d admit that an hour of it was spent listening to drunkards argue on their way home, like the guy who lost his car keys on Friday and he had to let his friends flag down a tuk tuk for him 🙂 I wish I got the whole conversation, but the man kept shouting “my wife will think I sold the car!”
  • I started working on a new novella. Can I do my happy dance now?

On reading:

I have found myself drawn to a couple of titles this weekend and I am looking forward to reading these four titles this week:

On traveling:

My feet are itching to go backpacking and now that I have completed the 31 Day Fitness Challenge (by totally ignoring the planks and abdominal crunches) I can safely say that I’m ready for some adventure.

I have been listening to JP Cooper‘s album “Raised Under Grey Skies” when I write. This album has kept me company for almost 20,000 words of the NanoWrimo challenge!

Related image
Google Images

Have a lovely week!

Travel diary; Bungoma 

I recently shared my experience in Chavakali and an interesting turn of events at The Crying stone in Mukhonje.

My trip to Western Kenya saw me visit Bungoma county today and I was so excited to be back that the team we were traveling with thought I was high on my own expectations. I love Bungoma. I love Kakamega. Honestly, I love where I can get some good milk tea and a whole cob of well roasted maize at twenty shillings. Please don’t remind me of Kapsabet, Kitale, Eldoret and Londiani…we are talking about Bungoma and Kakamega here.

So, we made our way through Kakamega to this place and arrived at around 3pm. We drove around looking for someplace to stay, with a limited budget, I kept reminding people in the car that any hotel behind Barclay’s Bank was out. During my previous stay I had no sleep because of the loud music played from the pubs around and in more than one occasion, I found myself listening in on more than I could handle. 

We drove along Moi Avenue (yes,there is a Moi Avenue in Bungoma) and we came to The County Comfort Hotel. I stepped out and asked for the rates and a chance to scout the room to see if it appealed to me. 

When I saw the room, I settled in, picking the most spacious of them all. It did not come with an awesome view because it overlooks the Shariff Centre which is a pit stop for Easy Coach buses. 

I did however love the tiny electric kettle they set up on the table. 

The receptionist told us we could prepare some instant coffee or tea with what they had provided. When she said this everyone turned to see me light up. The Driver however asked if his room had a mini fridge and Tusker, and when she said no, he walked back into the hallway. 

I am looking forward to visiting Chwele and though my stay is a short one, I hope it goes well and I can’t wait to visit more places.

Out and about in Western Kenya

It’s my second day in Chavakali and I’m onto my second teapot of the evening as I type this.

Chavakali is in Vihiga county and being here has had it’s peaks one of which is the extraordinary tea they offer and the other is that my Father once taught at the Chavakali Friends School. I found myself drawn to the school in a bid to retrace my Father’s foot steps and once I got to the gate, it felt like a whole three decades since he taught there.

I do however wish that the network reception for Airtel was 3G here because there is nothing as frustrating as having 5GB of data bundle and not being able to access emails or connect to internet because it’s forever unavailable. 

The best part also is that the hotel I checked into stated they have WiFi but no one knows the password or the network name, including the Hotel Manager.

I did visit The Crying Stone of Kakamega which is about a fifteen minute drive from Chavakali. We were looking for a place to park when two kids shouted at us “Crying Stone, we’ll take you,” and we let them lead the way. The boy, roughly aged 10 led the way while his younger sister gave us a brief historical background on the stone and the people living around the area.

The first stone at the entrance

When we climbed all the way towards the stone we met a man and three women, they told us the stone was on their ancestral land and asked for a viewing fee of three hundred shillings. We offered to pay a hundred because I had set aside some sixty shillings for the kids and felt cheated because it’s the kids who did all the work. They flagged us down, offered a history lesson, climbed those steep slopes with us and even showed us where to step. The adults took a while deliberating and when I started walking away, one of the women agreed and urged us to go ahead.

It’s a short steep climb to the rock, but for our visit, we didn’t see any tears…rather a wet patch and this huge rock. It’s breathtaking. 

The Crying Stone of Kakamega

I’ll visit a few more places then proceed to Bungoma where I can’t wait to see what’s changed since my last visit.

It’s raining now and I am hoping the Lady who served me tea can add me another teapot as I write a few chapters of Ushanga.

A cup of tea along the highway

I was in Turbo today which is roughly 34 kilometres from Eldoret town, and was making my way to Kipkaren- which is ideally 50 Kilometres.

Capture

So, there I was looking outside the window counting the endless acres of maize farms and wondering just how vast Uasin Gishu county is when we came to the junction of Eldoret and Kitale famously known as Maili-tisa (9 miles).

This is your simple hotel by the roadside, some place you walk in and get a hot cup of tea, or some warm food before you hit the road. It has no menu just a waitress who is glad you stopped by and immediately sets a cup before you and serves you hot milk tea!

Now, before you say hello, she starts by reciting the menu and then asks “Utatumia nini?”

Woe unto you if you say, “Dakika tano nifikirie” because that’s what I said…and before I could sip the tea before me, the team I was with were already washing their hands and digging into their ugali and beef stew!

I tried to get a better shot, but when you carry a compact DSLR chances are people would be drawn to what’s in your hands, and just when I thought I’d gotten a great shot…this tanker just pulled to a stop blocking more of the hotels, but you won’t miss them.

They look something awesome as this:

100_6885

And when you drive towards Kipkaren, some 10 or so kilometres, you’ll get to see the Baraka Farm Shop where you can get some milk, and cheese sandwiches if you are into your dairy products 🙂

100_6876100_6877